About Brain Change

Brian Change is a social enterprise focused on critical education and community organizing. Operating at the diverse intersection of music, journalism, and adult education, Brain Change provides performing arts, writing, and training to disrupt systems, establish new norms, and vitalize social justice. A playful reclamation, Brain Change is named after the commonly misspelled name of its founder, Brian Chang.

Musical Journalism

Brian Chang has been involved with choral music as a singer, administrator, and conductor for over a decade. In 2015 he started writing for the Wholenote Magazine as its resident Choral Scene columnist; providing news and insight on choral music to a 30,000-print circulation. In 2016 he became a regular contributor with Ludwig Van Toronto, formerly Musical Toronto. Capable of writing blog-style quick reads, in-depth interviews, editorials, and features, Brian's work always seeks to illuminate the reader with new angles, authoritative voice, and a creative edge. 

*Ludwig van Toronto is a member of the National Newsmedia Council   

CHORAL SCENE | Elevating the Profane

May 31, 2019

A consistent throughline at Luminato has been introducing local audiences to the international array of interesting, challenging collisions of storytelling and performance. In this year’s festival we have this multidisciplinary work inspired by Robert Mapplethorpe’s art...

CHORAL SCENE | Vocal Powerhouse Sing! The Toronto Vocal Arts Festival

Apr 29, 2019

In March, Suba Sankaran and Dylan Bell led a choral workshop as part of the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir’s Singsation Saturday program. In the church basement of Calvin Presbyterian Church, the duo led about 100 people in exploring their voices. No sheet music, no instruments. Nothing but the power of the a cappella, human voice....

CHORAL SCENE | VOCA in Action Discovering the Story at The Heart of a Song

Apr 1, 2019

Once in the fall and once in the spring, artistic director Jenny Crober brings in an artist to work with the VOCA Chorus of Toronto in an intensive workshop. Matthew Emery was the clinician for the fall, working on his song Still Colours, Velvet Shoes. At the very end Crober asked, “Do you mind if we take a little peek at Sing your Song? Would you mind telling them something about who you’ve dedicated this to and why?”...